Sunday Pep Talk | Cures For Bad Days

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Bad days suck. From the minute you wake up, the energy just feels different. Everyone seems distant. Communication is distorted. I thoroughly dislike bad days, but unfortunately everyone has them from time to time. Maybe more frequently than they’d like.

This winter has finally caught up to me. Even though the days are getting longer, it has been harder than normal to stay optimistic. Everything just ends up piling up on top of you until you are smothered under the weight of all the shit that needs done. And the worst thing of all is when you try your best to remain neutral in social settings and people end up being rude or unkind to you anyways. Like, can’t you see I’m trying here? Can’t you see that everyone is having a difficult time with things today?

I’ve been having trouble writing this week. All of my story plots suddenly looked transparent to me, like paper houses easily blown down by the smallest long winded criticism. I have started feeling like a fraud in my own life, like I shouldn’t even try to be a published author. I could keep this to myself and wait until I feel motivated again, but I want to share this with you all, because I know everyone has bad days, and maybe this will comfort you just a little bit. You are not alone! And it’s ok to have bad days!

So to combat these feelings of negativity, I have compiled a small list of activities that make me feel better. Just because the day starts out bad (or continues to be bad), doesn’t mean it will end bad, or that it will turn into a bad week. Sometimes the creativity just doesn’t flow, and the first step to fixing a bad day is realizing that this is ok!

“Nothing in nature blooms all year. Be patient with yourself.” – Karen Salmansohn


Here’s what I like to do when I’m feeling down:

  • Eat chocolate
  • Eat comfort food
  • Close your eyes and focus for one minute on your breathing
  • Think of your favorite person. It will make you smile. Trust me.
  • Journal it out
  • Share your thoughts with a friend
  • Call your mom
  • Watch The Office
  • Wear your favorite dress around the house
  • Take a nap
  • Take a bubble bath
  • Plan a vacation
  • Research something new
  • Pull some tarot cards
  • Watch funny vine videos
  • Make a to-do list
  • Avoid everyone. Sometimes this is good. Other times it only makes it worse.
  • Stop thinking about the stressor (for me, this week, it’s writing)
  • Do some yoga (intense stretch, much relax)

I plan on doing two or three of these tonight. What are some of your go-to’s when you are feeling down? We’d love to hear new suggestions!

For more inspiration, check out:

How to Make A Motivation Board
Winter Blues
SAD
11 Things To Do On A Rainy Day

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Take care, friends!

Kat

Sunday Pep Talk | Winter Blues

As I write this, the weather outside plays at false spring. The sun is shining, the skies are endlessly blue, whipped with an occasional white cloud that moves by quickly and without threat. Earlier it was raining. Tomorrow it will be snowing.

The winter months can be depressing. Shorter days and lack of sunlight bring our moods down. We struggle just to make it through to the spring, hoping that relief will come in April. We lock ourselves away from the bitter night winds and huddle under blankets and layers of warm clothing.

Like all the rest of nature, we need sunlight to survive. Without it, our souls wither. According to NIMH,

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starting in the late fall and early winter and going away during the spring and summer. Depressive episodes linked to the summer can occur, but are much less common than winter episodes of SAD.

I know the worst months seem to never end, and the sunlit spring goes too quickly. But in these dormant months of housebound seclusion and shorter days, we can put our energy and work into other things. Instead of socializing with friends and going on outdoor adventures, the winter months are a wonderful time to start new projects.

Let’s take a look at a list of things you can do to combat the winter blues.


Learn a new skill

Read all the books

Write a book of your own

Complete a puzzle

Start a yoga routine

Sort through your things

Take a warm bath

Start a bullet journal

Make a playlist

Plan a vacation

Take naps


It’s ok to slow down in the winter. It should be a time of restoration, self care, and reflection. Take the extra time you need in order to be ok. If this means spending more time alone, take it. If that means putting your work on the front burner and powering through, do it. Just keep going and eventually things will improve. Remember to take care of yourself too, just like you take care of your loved ones. It’s also ok to put your needs first sometimes. Make sure your emotions and mental health are stable. You can’t pour from an empty cup.


Hang in there, friends! Winter only lasts 3 months! The days have already begun to grow longer! We can make it through!

Need a little more pep? Check out these Pep Talks: SAD, Gratitude, Growth.

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Take care, and don’t forget to take your medications!

Kat